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at film from august of 1963 as demonstration and marchers gathered on the mall here in washington d.c. this was the headline from the washington post, a mammoth rally of 200,000 jamming the mall in a solemn orderly plea for equality. that's our line for those of you over the age of 50. for those of you under the age of 50. 585-3880. 202 is the area code here in washington d.c. we'll get your call on march. >> your calls and comments in a moment. lots get to the other stories this morning that is latest development from syria and headlines from overseas. the guardian newspaper the attack on syria just days away as the house of commons recalled for a vote and the picture of the british prime minster as he departs yesterday as the parliament resuming session tomorrow breaking from their august recess. from the marine herald, -- miami herald, a stage is set. u.s. and allies act as syria's intelligence mount. as u.s. officials said privately that a flood of previously undisclosed intelligence including satellite images and intercepted communication erased last minute administration doubt
of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> good morning from washington. it's friday august 23, 2013. i'm chuck todd. this is a special edition of "the daily rundown." we're looking ahead to the 50th anniversary of that famous 1963 march on washington. for many americans, 50 years ago feels like yesterday. but of course for millions of others, including myself who weren't even born yet, in an ironic way, the grand memorial of granite and marble that now stands might make that history feel more distant. particularly for many young people today. we remember dr. king's march as an historical event. through grainy film and archive photos. but for each of us, those four words, "i have a dream," have a different and special renaissanreno sans. since then, every political protest in this country has borrowed from what the leaders of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were able to achieve. tomorrow, thousands will retrace their steps. next week, president obama will mark the 50th anniversary of the march with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. i
company" -- 50 years after the historic march on washington, we go back to the scene with john lewis, who spoke that day half a century ago. where you're standing now, looking out there. that's all the crowd. >> it was good to be in the presence of lincoln. and i feel honored to have an opportunity to come here almost 50 years later. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at anne gumowitz. the betsy and
the anniversary of the "i have a dream" speech and the famous march on washington. that pivotal moment in history signaled a turning point in the nation's civil right movement with a quarter of million people marming for equal rights. as it was back then, many are getting set now to speak out on dr. king's dream. and the movement. the march begins shortly down independence avenue, passing the new martin luther king memorial and winds up at the washington monument. that is where doug mckelway is standing by on what is a gorgeous day in our nation's capital city. hi, doug. >> it is a gorgeous day. a spectacular day for the event today. the march on washington in 1963 was the single largest gathering of people in washington up until that time. i'll let the ambulance pass by here. join me as i step on the curb here. all right. there we go. there have been largeer crowds sincebe that day but up until that time it was the largest crowd. the national park service stopped measuring crowd size since the million man march because they were criticized to overestimate size crowd by some groups and underestim
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
. >> when marion came to washington d.c., he came into a sleepy southern town. >> white business, white political power, white everything ruled the city. >> the city was like a plantation. we didn't have elections. no mayor, no city council. we couldn't vote. congress controlled d.c. >> control of washington d.c. was about one person, that's representative john mcmillan of south carolina. he was a racist. and so that guided all of his politics. he used the district in ways that were designed to maintain the segregation, keep black folks down. >> they'd all been told, we black people will never vote. politics is white people's business. we should never agitate white people. if they tell us to get off the street, get the hell off the street! >> barry: politically, we were nowhere. we were just backward. people weren't used to registering to vote because they couldn't vote for anything. it was awful. and that makes anybody want to get angry. and not only make you angry, make you want to do something about it. it was time for me, i think, to be here. >> woman: [screaming at police] >> barry
anniversary of the march on washington and the legacy of martin luther king, junior how radicalo forget this was, how kennedys white house tried to get the andnizers to call it off, how the majority of americans had an unfavorable view of it. the peaceful protest seemed impossible to fathom. violence.d of it is universally acknowledged as one of the seminal events of the 20th century as they stood to demand those jobs and freedom. epic tome is considered the gold standard for that era. all this is coming up right now. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. inc. you. thank you. >> joining us now to kick off these three nights of this historicon anniversary is the author of "the king years." fromr branch joins us washington. it is good to have you back on the program. >> i have been. talking and getting the message out. let me start with the obvious questions. how does the march on washington ?it into this narrative >> it comes in 1963, when the sees politicsly by the throat because of the demonstrations in birmingham earlier that spring culminating ofthe citiz
after dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech, washington and the world will reflect on the work still to be done. meantime, the u.s. and the world allies let syria know that chemical attacks will not be tolerated. we'll get the latest on what kind of military strike could punish assad without somehow swaying the country's civil war. those realities weigh heavily on president obama today when he marks the dream anniversary, honoring the legacy of nonviolence on the eve of an expected u.s.-led military strike. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, august 28th, 2013. this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. today is the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet
georgia. recently, he and i returned to the national mall in washington to remember that day in 1963 and the march that changed america. >> people were all the way down. and you just saw hundreds and thousands of individuals. i'm john lewis, and i was the youngest speaker. ten of us spoke. i spoke number six. dr. king spoke number ten. and out of the ten people that spoke that day, i'm the only one still around. >> congratulations. >> what's that? >> congratulations. >> thank you very much. >> it was a great moment in american life. >> you were his friend? >> yeah. i got to know dr. king. i met him in 1958 when i was 18. but i first heard of him when i was 15 years old in the 10th grade. we worked together. we marched together. we got arrested together in selma, alabama. >> have you ever heard this story before? >> yes, i have. >> you have? >> i watched it on tv. >> you did? >> so you know about the sit-ins? the freedom ride? >> yeah. >> people marching for the right to vote? you know, i was on the march from selma to montgomery. i was beaten. on march 7th, 1965, a group of us, about
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
, is to follow the efforts in washington today to present all of the options. >> so you do believe there would have to be a man date first from an international body? >> that's what he has said. if he can't get the united neighborhoods there are other man datas he could look for. >> is at this point all hope for diplomatic solution lost. >> it's very hard to see a diplomatic solution. the opposition has dis united. the government made up its mind to crush the rebellions and uprisings that were occurring around at a time country. it's going to be very hard to get people negotiating for a solution. >> all right. ambassador richard murphy, we thank you so much for coming in this morning. >> pleasure. >>> it's shaping up to be a beautiful morning across the northeast. high pressure is in control. and we continue to deal with nothing but sunshine. take a look. hard to find anything here on the radar. clear skies. we did have a cold front push through earlier on the week. luckily, now, the skies are shaping up. it's going to be a gorgeous day temperaturewise, nice and comfortable. in albany, 76. new
anniversary of the march on washington. inside story is next. >>> 50 years after the march on washington there are lingering challenges to the modern social justice movement and a modern debathe as to how to accomplish dr. king's dream. this is inside story. hello everybody i'm david shuster, it was called a march for jobs and freedom. hundreds of thousands of peaceful protestors gathered on the national mall and ignited a new conversation about civil rights in america. highlighted by the march and by dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech are still alive today. still ahead, we'll examine inquality and social justice. finally, we'll take you to an organizer who was there. joyce ladner. >> i had a stage pass. no one on that stage had ever seen that many people before. that's the major one memory. i have a lot of others as well. >> was it an energetic crowd? was it a me mesmerized crowd? >> it was a very friendly crowd. it was almost like meeting new friends. it was easy going. it was an easy crowd. >> was there a sense that eventually society would progress and things would ch
>>> on the broadcast tonight from washington -- ready to strike. the u.s. prepare as military attack on syria, but tonight the house speaker tells the president to slow down. we'll take a closer look at the possible consequences of american military action. >>> remembering the dream. 50 years after dr. king's historic speech, a huge crowd comes here to celebrate, remember and inspire the nation to finish the job. >>> death sentence for the army psychiatrist convicted in the massacre at fort hood. >>> and air scare. a new warning tonight about the wildfire at yosemite and what it's doing to the air people are breathing so many miles away. "nightly news" begins now. >>> and good evening. i'm lester holt in for brian. here in washington, talk of war and peace at the lincoln memorial where martin luther king jr. delivered his famous "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago today. president obama headlined a chorus of speakers saluting the racial justice that changed this country. a lot more on that in a few minutes. >>> but first, the remmings in this city about a possible military at
to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. i et a man not long ago, tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, you're right. civil rights didn't write your resume. but civil rights made somebody ead your resum
approaches this situation is a top priority. "the washington post" published something online that u.s.,s details about the that the budget has grown enormously since 9/11, that the cia is far bigger than outside experts had estimated, that the u.s. is involved in new cyber programs to attack other programs in countries. this information has never been released despite efforts from outside folks. does the president believe this is helpful now and the current climate to have discussion about the details about how the u.s. is spending its money in these departments to get a better understanding, as he said, make the public comfortable with how this money is being spayed and what type of programs are being used? -- that storyhed was published since i walked out here. i'm not in a position to comment on a specific story. the president believes that strengthening public confidence in these programs is important to the success of these programs. there is little debate about the fact these programs are critical to our national security, that they have made a role in protecting the homeland
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
king, jr.'s, famous, i have a dream speech in washington. >> more people there than i have ever seen in one place in my entire life. >> hear from a bay area woman who attended that historic march and how she and others are commemorating king's legacy. >> vendors supplying your produce, fighting for space. no more. the new plan to bring them all under one roof. >> it is back. a chance a authority back in the forecast. we'll pinpoint the location as the news continues right here on the cw. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, washington today, to commeme >>> tens of thousands of people packed the national mall in washington today to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the historic march on washington for civil rights. family members of reverend martin luther king, jr., delivered his famous, i have a dream speech at the march led today's event along with other civil rights leaders. >> this is not the time for a commemoration, nor is this the time for self-congratulations celebration. the task is not done. the journey is not complete. >> some of those in the crowd had attended the march 50 years ago, the
. seven blacks and six whites left washington, d.c. on two buses they headed south. at first, only minor hostility greeted them. but when one bus arrived in birmingham alabama, a mob surrounded them and beat the freedom fighters. >> i was on the greyhound, that was the bus they set on fire. burned it. and we would have all burned to death had it not been for the fact that one of the fuel tanks of the bus exploded, scared the hell out of the mob. >> reporter: that ride ended abruptly and the riders feared the violence would snuff out the movement. the first ride was not the last. students willing to face death picked up the cause boarding buses heading south. in his san francisco home, frank nelson shares his story with blankenhide. nelson took his first ride in june, by then the movement had spread to trains. >> they got off the train and headed to the homes that were right there. the black riders went into the whites homes and they were carted off to jail. >> reporter: nelson was 23 when his body was bruised and beaten. >> friend, i'm a mississippi segragist and i'm proud of it. >> repo
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
the new york time yesterday and also washington post and as you said, a lot of social media and other important media in the western world -- >> it's getting worse. the problem is that they are not even that sophisticated, i mean, in fact, we saw how -- we know that some of them are what we call -- they do not launch complex attacks, but those attacks are out there launching and working. that's my big concern now. >> we've heard for years that cyber attacks could take out power grids, financial markets, banks and officials have done drills and simulated attacks. we're going to show you one called cyber shock wave, produced by the bipartisan policy center, including a whole officials. >> the country's internet system is now slowing down to a virtual crawl. communications with financial trading houses are almost at a stand still. >> it is an active war. you turn off everybody's cell phone, you don't allow them to bank, work, communicate be this is an attack on the united states. it may not be a bomb, but it's much more significant than a bomb going off. >> scary simulation there. what s
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
be the secretary of dhs is the most thankless job in washington. that is not true. no doubt, it is a very big and comics job. it is literally a 24/7 job, that as my successor will soon learn, it is also one of the most rewarding jobs there is. what you do hear matters to the lives of people all across our great nation him and your decisions affect them in direct and tangible ways. you make sure their families are safe from terrorist threats, that their local first responders have equipment and training and funding, and that when disaster strikes people who have lost everything are given food and shelter and hope. and that thanks for that is not owed any single individual or cabinet secretary, but to that 240,000 dhs employees, many of whom work in tough conditions around the clock to accomplish our shared and noble mission, and that includes some who have made the ultimate sacrifice for our country. they are the backbone of your nation's homeland security, and over the past 4 1/2 years, it has been my pleasure to serve with them and build a more agile department of homeland security. i thank
at the 1963 march on washington for jobs on freedom. "he has got the whole world in his hands. >> let us listen please to the words of this song and understand that in the heart of our creator, every soul has the same value and should be valued equally. thank you very much for the opportunity to sing for you. ♪ he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole wide world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. he's got the whole world in his hands. [singing "he's got the whole ♪orld in his hands"] ♪ [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the speaker of the united states house of representatives, the honorable john boehner. >> how about a round of applause? [applause] let me thank my colleagues for their testimonials and express my gratitude to all the members of staff of the congressional black caucus in their assistance planning this ceremony. we have many guests. the mayor is here. our attorney general is here. we want to welcome all of you. right now, i have the distinct honor of introducing a great patriot, the recipient of the presidential medal of freedom, a
have a dream" speech at the lincoln memorial, and thousands today are gathering on the washington mall to celebrate that historic event. >>> we start in syria where the government is now accusing rebel forces of using chemical weapons. the claim comes as president obama meets with his national security team at the white house to talk about the reports of chemical weapons attacks by the syrian government. syrian state tv says soldiers found chemical weapons in tunnels used by rebels. cnn cannot confirm those claims or the authenticity of these images. the opposition claims government forces launched a nerve gas attack, killing hundreds of civilians. meanwhile a top u.n. official is in damascus today asking to investigate the alleged use of chemical weapons by the syrian government. president obama sat down with our chris kuomo earlier and he said the u.s. is still gathering information on the attack. >> what we've seen indicates that this is clearly a big event of grave concern. and we are already in communications with the entire international community. we're moving through the u.n. t
cord, tacoma washington. >> a short time okay t hamid karzi reacted to the bales' sentencing >> a life sentence to him or a death sentence to him will not bring back our children that he killed. if will not bring back the happiness of those families and will not replace the loss that the afghan nation suffered. >>> karzi also said he does not back capital punishment and asked that the u.s. provided compensation to the families of those killed. >>> the sentencing phase of the trial begins made for major nadal hassan. a military jury found him guilty of killing 13 fellow soldiers in 2009. hassan admitted to the murders in court and had no reaction on friday when the guilty verdict was red. the jury will now decide if he will be executed for his crimes or spend the rest of his life in prison. >>> washington state police are hunting for a teenager who is suspected of beating an 88-year-old world war ii veteran to death. another teenager is already in custody for the crime. police found the veteran in his car on wednesday with serious injuries. he died in the hospital yesterday. so far, police do no
. ♪ [applause] >> thank you. 50 years ago, they did not take a bus outing to come to washington. there will be those that will miscast this as some great social event. but let us remember 50 years ago some came to washington having rode the back of buses. some came to washington that couldn't stop and buy a cup of coffee until they got across the mason dixon line. some came to washington sleeping in their cars because they couldn't rent a motel room. some came to washington never having had the privilege to vote. some came having seen their friends shed blood. but they came to washington so we could come today in a different time and a different place and we owe them for what we have today. [applause] i met a man not long ago, i tell it often, he says i'm african american but i don't understand all this civil rights marching you're talking about, reverend al. i've accomplished, i've achieved. look at my resume. i went to the best schools. i'm a member of the right clubs. i had the right people read my resume. civil rights didn't write my resume. i looked at his resume. i said, y
think about the march on washington they only think about the dream speech and that part of the speech. they don't think about anything else and you are right. he said a lot harsher things than anyone talked about. this is including the absence of women on the stage on purpose. they even missed the dream part of the speech. they were looking so much for the violence that they did not see it. i'm wondering how they thought, with anyen there, notice that they've missed the story. >> i want to address media coverage on the march on washington and i remember the three major networks were there. withoutered it interruption and they broadcasted it to europe. "the washington post" assign more than 60 reporters to cover that story. it was really big news. a congressman, you said that the civil rights movement without the media would be like a bird without wings. what did you mean? >> i meant that. >> i know you did, but tell us what you meant. without the media, especially in the american south, without reporters, without the photographer, without the cameras to bring the message .nto the livi
on washington remains a seminal moment in american history. tonight, we kick off a series of discussions to mark the anniversary. >> we've forgotten most of the >> brown: and remembering a stalwart of american political journalism. we look back at the career of the long-time reporter, columnist and t.v. commentator, jack germond. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. >> brown: the political crisis in egypt reached a new turning point today. security forces made good on a pledge to sweep away sit-ins that sprang up after the military ousted president mohammed morsi in late june. the country's health ministry reported at least 235 civilians and 4
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
memorial in washington, d.c., where we all try to advance the dream. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in," as the struggle for low-wage employees continues, fast food worker strikes demanding higher wages spread across the country. my guess tonight is the former ceo of mcdonald's, who says raising the minimum wage will kill jobs. i disagree, and that's coming up. >>> also tonight, this weekend we commemorate the 50th anniversary on the civil rights march on washington. tonight, a look at a half century of racial progress. how far we have come and how far we have yet to go. >>> but we begin tonight with president obama, who just a few hours ago completed the last of four speeches in two days about something that is increasing the source of high anxiety for middle class families, the cost of higher education. >> over the last three decades, the cost of higher education has gone up 260% at a time when family incomes have gone up about 16%. >> the president may have been slightly understating just how bad it is. while the cost of a private non-profit four-ye
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